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The 7.7×58mm Arisaka cartridge, Type 99 rimless 7.7 mm or 7.7mm Japanese was a rifle cartridge which was used in the Imperial Japanese Army’s Arisaka Type

Cartridge 7.7x58mm Japanese Arisaka
Grain Weight 174 Grains
Quantity 20 Round
Muzzle Velocity 2500 Feet Per Second
Muzzle Energy 2415 Foot Pounds
Bullet Style Jacketed Soft Point
Lead Free No
Case Type Brass

20 PER BOX

Description

Products overview on 7.7 jap

The 7.7 jap Arisaka cartridge was the standard military cartridge for the Imperial Japanese Army’s and the Imperial Japanese Army Air Service during World War II. The 7.7 jap cartridge was designed as the successor of the 6.5×50mmSR cartridge for rifles and machine guns but was never able to fully replace it by the end of the war.

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BRIEF history about 7.7 jap

The 7.7 jap bullets would first be used by the Japanese military in the.303 British cartridge for machine guns installed on early aircraft like the Ro-Go Ko-gata seaplane around the conclusion of World War I. The Imperial Japanese Army sought to produce its own 7.7 jap ammo in various semi-rimmed and rimless cases for the Infantry and the Army Air Service, but the Imperial Japanese Navy continued to equip machine guns with rimmed.303 under the 7.7mm name. In 1919, a 7.7 jap ammo army rifle prototype saw the first testing of a rimless 7.758mm cartridge. [4] Throughout the 1920s and 1930s, trials would still be conducted, but the development of air-cooled aircraft machine guns would take precedence.

7.7 jap ammo

The Imperial Japanese Army started developing a new line of machine guns in 1920, which eventually led to the approval of the Type 89 aviation machine gun versions and the designation of the 7.758mm semi-rimmed ball cartridge in 1930. Lead loaded and 10.5 g in weight, the 7.758mm ball bullet had a cupronickel-plated jacket (162 gr). In addition to being adopted as Type 89 specialty ammunition, tracer, armor-piercing, incendiary, and explosive rounds also received Type 92 designations for air and ground use machine guns in 1934.

Throughout World War II, the Army’s planes would continue to use Type 89 ammo. A bigger projectile was specifically required to improve the terminal ballistics when the Type 92 heavy machine gun was adopted for infantry usage in 1933, hence the 7.758mmSR Type 89 ball cartridge was upgraded to take a 13.2 g (203.7 gr) bullet with a brass jacket. For the heavy machine gun used by the infantry, the ammunition was designated as the Type 92 ball cartridge in 1934.

However, in 1937 it was discovered that rimless cartridges performed better in tests for the magazine-fed Type 97 in-vehicle heavy machine gun. As a result, the Type 92 case rim was reduced from 12.7 to 12.0 mm while keeping the same bullet weight, resulting in the Type 97, 7.758mm rimless cartridge, which was adopted in late 1937. When the Type 99 rifles and light machine guns were being developed in 1940, the Type 97 cartridge’s case was modified because it was determined that a bullet weighing 11.8 g (182 gr) was more effective against short-range targets.

The rim diameter of the Type 97 cartridge was standardized to 12.1 mm with the ultimate adoption of the rimless Type 99 7.7-58mm ball cartridge in 1940, while the late-production Type 92 ammunition was adjusted by decreasing the diameter of the case rim from 12.7 to 12.1 mm to further simplify logistics.

As a result, the older 7.758mm variations, including the specific ammunition, could be used with some accuracy variation in the Type 99 rifles and light machine guns. However, the Type 92 heavy machine gun would continue to use the current semi-rimmed cartridges throughout World War II.

Product Overview on 7.7 jap

For many years, Norma ammunition has built an outstanding reputation as premium ammunition for hunters in Europe and Africa. Today, Norma USA is pleased to offer American PH, ammunition designed specifically for the North American big game hunter. This ammunition is loaded with premium hunting bullets for maximum terminal performance.

Norma Soft Point bullets are conventional lead-tipped bullets perfect for hunting thin-skinned game. On impact, these bullets rapidly expand and mushroom to produce immediate devastation to the vitals.

WARNING: This product can expose you to Lead, which is known to the State of California to cause cancer and birth defects or other reproductive harm. For more information go to – www.P65Warnings.ca.gov.

Specifications Norma American PH Ammunition 7.7mm Japanese 174 Grain Soft Point

Product Information

Cartridge 7.7x58mm Japanese Arisaka
Grain Weight 174 Grains
Quantity 20 Round
Muzzle Velocity 2500 Feet Per Second
Muzzle Energy 2415 Foot Pounds
Bullet Style Jacketed Soft Point
Lead Free No
Case Type Brass
Primer Boxer
Corrosive No
Reloadable Yes
Velocity Rating Supersonic

Delivery Information

Shipping Weight 1.365 Pounds
DOT-Regulated Yes

Frequently Asked Questions – 7.7x58mm Arisaka

1. What is the 7.7x58mm Arisaka cartridge? The 7.7x58mm Arisaka is a centerfire rifle cartridge that was developed and used by the Imperial Japanese Army during World War II. It was the standard issue ammunition for the Type 99 rifle and machine guns.

2. What firearms use the 7.7x58mm Arisaka cartridge? The 7.7x58mm Arisaka cartridge was designed specifically for use in the Type 99 rifle series, which includes the Type 99 Arisaka rifle and Type 99 Light Machine Gun (Type 99 LMG). These firearms were used by the Imperial Japanese Army during World War II.

3. Is the 7.7x58mm Arisaka cartridge still in production? The 7.7x58mm Arisaka cartridge is no longer produced on a large scale since it was primarily used by the Imperial Japanese Army during World War II. However, limited quantities of surplus ammunition can still be found on the market.

4. Can the 7.7x58mm Arisaka cartridge be reloaded? Yes, the 7.7x58mm Arisaka cartridge can be reloaded. Reloaders can obtain brass casings, bullets, primers, and powder to reload their own ammunition. It is important to follow safe reloading practices and consult reliable reloading manuals for specific instructions.

5. What is the ballistics performance of the 7.7x58mm Arisaka cartridge? The 7.7x58mm Arisaka cartridge typically fires a 174-grain spitzer or boat-tail bullet at around 2,400 feet per second (730 meters per second). It produces moderate recoil and has effective range capabilities of up to approximately 1,200 yards (1,100 meters).

6. Can the 7.7x58mm Arisaka cartridge be used for hunting or sport shooting today? Yes, the 7.7x58mm Arisaka cartridge can still be used for hunting or sport shooting today. While it is not as common as more modern cartridges, hunters and sport shooters who own firearms chambered in 7.7x58mm Arisaka can use it for various applications, including hunting medium-sized game.

7. Are there any limitations or considerations when using the 7.7x58mm Arisaka cartridge? When using the 7.7x58mm Arisaka cartridge, it is important to consider the availability of ammunition and reloading components, as well as the potential need for firearms chambered in this specific caliber. Additionally, it is crucial to follow all applicable laws and regulations related to firearm ownership, possession, and usage in your jurisdiction.

8. Where can I find ammunition or reloading components for the 7.7x58mm Arisaka cartridge? While the availability of new production ammunition for the 7.7x58mm Arisaka cartridge may be limited, surplus ammunition can be occasionally found through various firearms and ammunition vendors. Reloading components, such as brass casings and bullets, can also be sourced from specialty reloading suppliers.

Additional Information

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